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Frustration

Around 21 September when Lost Lady was published, I ordered FIVE author's copies.

While waiting for them, friends had bought copies and were writing with comments and questions and talking about the cover, and I hadn't seen it yet!

Yesterday, when my copies were finally due to be delivered, I had a message from Amazon saying that the box (printed in Germany) had been damaged and they were refunding my money. It obviously never occurred to the wizards at Amazon that I might actually want the copies, but no option was given.

In desperation to see the book, I ordered one copy at retail rates today (12 October) and was notified that it would be delivered Monday (14 October). Presumably, that will be printed in the UK - so why weren't my author's copies?

Maybe they will be after Brexit - if there is an after Brexit.


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